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07-Jan-2015 01:36

Is any other subculture reported on so exclusively by its own members?Or with a frequency and an extensiveness that bear so little relation to its size?But only when writing such things for their own kind do so-called foodies truly let down their guard, which makes for some engrossing passages here and there. The deeper an outsider ventures into this stuff, the clearer a unique community comes into view.In values, sense of humor, even childhood experience, its members are as similar to each other as they are different from everyone else. Vogue’s restaurant critic, Jeffrey Steingarten, says he “spends the afternoon—or a week of afternoons—planning the perfect dinner of barbecued ribs or braised foie gras.” Michael Pollan boasts in The New York Times of his latest “36-Hour Dinner Party.” Similar schedules and priorities can be inferred from the work of other writers.dined with him in restaurants: the host who insists on calling his special friend out of the kitchen for some awkward small talk.

“A true gastronome,” according to a British dining manual of the time, “is as insensible to suffering as is a conqueror.” But for the past several decades, factory farms have made meat ever cheaper and—as the excellent book The CAFO [Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations] Reader makes clear—the pain and trauma are thrown in for free.

been crucial to the gourmet’s pleasure that he eat in ways the mainstream cannot afford.

For hundreds of years this meant consuming enormous quantities of meat.

The flyleaf calls Spoon Fed “a testament to the wisdom that can be found in the kitchen.” Agreed.

To put aside these books after a few chapters is to feel a sense of liberation; it’s like stepping from a crowded, fetid restaurant into silence and fresh air.

“A true gastronome,” according to a British dining manual of the time, “is as insensible to suffering as is a conqueror.” But for the past several decades, factory farms have made meat ever cheaper and—as the excellent book The CAFO [Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations] Reader makes clear—the pain and trauma are thrown in for free.been crucial to the gourmet’s pleasure that he eat in ways the mainstream cannot afford.For hundreds of years this meant consuming enormous quantities of meat.The flyleaf calls Spoon Fed “a testament to the wisdom that can be found in the kitchen.” Agreed.To put aside these books after a few chapters is to feel a sense of liberation; it’s like stepping from a crowded, fetid restaurant into silence and fresh air.A disinterested writer would likely have done the subject more justice.