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13-Jun-2016 02:31

The reign of Nechtan, which began barely thirty years later, had seen the revival of Northumbrian pressure, spearheaded by issues involving the Pictish Church.But Northumbrian violence was as much a weapon as the gentler overtures of Bede and his abbey of Monkwearmouth and Jarrow; the Picts had been heavily defeated by the Northumbrians on the plain of Manaw, probably somewhere in West Lothian, in 711.There was calculated destabilisation of one kingdom by another or the creation of satellite states.But the status of such client kingdoms might range from the simple paying of tribute to outright overlordship.If the eighth century saw the withering of the influence of Pictland's southern neighbour, it may also have seen a new, closer relationship with another, the British kingdom of Strathclyde.For, as we have seen, the Pictish king victorious at Nechtansmere was Bridei mac Bile, who may have had a father who was a Strathclyde Briton.But the story was longer than this and it was a two-stage process.The first stage had begun by the end of the third century with the confederation of a number of loosely related tribes under a common name; by the sixth century they were grouped under two overkings and by c. The second stage, which belongs largely to the ninth century, was the consolidation of these peoples during a number of key, lengthy reigns which remain amongst the most obscure in the whole of Scottish history.

It is likely that such a clash marked the whole period between the reign of Constantine, son of Fergus (789-820) and Constantine 11(900-43).This is a section from the book "Scotland: a New History" by Michael Lynch which covers Scottish history from the earliest times to the present.There is an Index page of all the sections of the book up to the end of the 14th century which have been added to Rampant Scotland.The pages were previously part of the "Scottish Radiance" Web site.The early history of Scotland is seen conventionally as the story of progress towards the 'making of a kingdom', with the decisive steps being taken in the ninth, tenth and eleventh centuries.

It is likely that such a clash marked the whole period between the reign of Constantine, son of Fergus (789-820) and Constantine 11(900-43).This is a section from the book "Scotland: a New History" by Michael Lynch which covers Scottish history from the earliest times to the present.There is an Index page of all the sections of the book up to the end of the 14th century which have been added to Rampant Scotland.The pages were previously part of the "Scottish Radiance" Web site.The early history of Scotland is seen conventionally as the story of progress towards the 'making of a kingdom', with the decisive steps being taken in the ninth, tenth and eleventh centuries.The century before the 840s saw these important processes at work.